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Monday, April 19, 2010

Recipe - Pad Thai - NYTimes.com

Pad Thai
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CloseLinkedinDiggFacebookMixxMySpaceYahoo! BuzzPermalink Published: April 16, 2010
Time: 25 minutes

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Related
Pad Thai, an Easy Stir-Fry (April 21, 2010)
4 ounces fettuccine-width rice stick noodles

1/4 cup peanut oil

1/4 cup tamarind paste

1/4 cup fish sauce (nam pla)

1/3 cup honey

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste

1/4 cup chopped scallions

1 garlic clove, minced

2 eggs

1 small head Napa cabbage, shredded (about 4 cups)

1 cup mung bean sprouts

1/2 pound peeled shrimp, pressed tofu or a combination

1/2 cup roasted peanuts, chopped

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

2 limes, quartered.



1. Put noodles in a large bowl and add boiling water to cover. Let sit until noodles are just tender; check every 5 minutes or so to make sure they do not get too soft. Drain, drizzle with one tablespoon peanut oil to keep from sticking and set aside. Meanwhile, put tamarind paste, fish sauce, honey and vinegar in a small saucepan over medium-low heat and bring just to a simmer. Stir in red pepper flakes and set aside.

2. Put remaining 3 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat; when oil shimmers, add scallions and garlic and cook for about a minute. Add eggs to pan; once they begin to set, scramble them until just done. Add cabbage and bean sprouts and continue to cook until cabbage begins to wilt, then add shrimp or tofu (or both).

3. When shrimp begin to turn pink and tofu begins to brown, add drained noodles to pan along with sauce. Toss everything together to coat with tamarind sauce and combine well. When noodles are warmed through, serve, sprinkling each dish with peanuts and garnishing with cilantro and lime wedges.

Yield: 4 servings.
Recipe - Pad Thai - NYTimes.com

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Smokin'

Smokin' THis guy is a real foodie. Incredible.
After having relocated to SoCal, and finding myself predictably out of work, and having nothing better to do with my time, I began a great love affair with BBQ. In 2005, seemingly every food publication was talking BBQ. I learned that BBQ is not grilling, but instead is "low and slow" roasting in the presence of wood smoke. Turns out I had never had real BBQ in my life, but rather sauced meat that people called BBQ. But with everyone talking about it, it must be compelling. So I began doing it, to see why everyone was talking about it, to see why it was compelling. It wasn't just the ambience of the BBQ restaurants, because as I learned, there is no ambience. BBQ was frequently served in dirty, smoky holes-in-the-wall, charming in their way, but devoid of the props (fine china, white tablecloth, great table service) that propel many of us to try new restaurants. Instead, it's all about the food- solid, masculine, smoky meat, with sides like you'd get at home from your grandma if she had grown up and learned to cook in the '30s or '40s, Settlement Cookbook style. I'm talking about macaroni and cheese (obviously not on my menu), cole slaw and potato salad, baked potatoes, various vegetable casseroles, etc. And of course, Barbecue is typically served on paper, with a minimum of fuss.
Surprising as it may be, we discovered that the Jewish community, especially the women, don't seem to respond kindly to paper. Consequently, last week we switched to china/stoneware, inauthentic though it may be. More important to have customers. And, we now offer a wider variety of food than before, attempting to have at least 1 vegetarian soup available at all times. And since we love them, we've been featuring jook (Cantonese rice porridge, made with turkey broth) and/or pho (Vietnamese beef noodle soup), esoteric to the Jewish community at large, but widely eaten serious food among nonJews. They may not be BBQ, but they hit the spot- like BBQ, they're comfort foods from their respective cultures. Jook is something my wife, Jennifer, grew up with, being San Francisco Cantonese, while Pho is something so popular in Los Angeles culture that we could not help but wonder about its attraction, and having produced creditable pho at home, fell in love with it. Obviously, the pho we make is faux pho, in that we substitute other things for fish sauce. And we have provided vegetarian onion soup, minestrone, vegetable soup and/or split pea soup for those vegetarians who find themselves dragged to Smokin'! with their carnivorous cohorts. We don't always have vegetarian soups, though, so please call ahead of time to check.
For catering, we can try anything you like, given enough advance notice, from smoked duck to smoked rib roast, and even plenty of un-smoked food. Please be aware, though, that not everything is readily available, or in stock in our kitchen or even at the distributor. We're pleased to work with you to bring your concept beautifully to fruition. And in this difficult economic time, please be aware that BBQ catering is often much less expensive than standard catering. One reason for this is that BBQ is typically delivered in steam table pans, and served as a buffet. Often catering is not even done on-site, and is treated like standard take-out or delivery, which makes it inherently appropriate for casual affairs. But even when it's desired for a more formal affair, the food costs themselves are often less than other types of foods. Where table service is desired, we can work with other caterers or event planners to get the job done, though we do not have the staff to do it ourselves.
We love catering Purim parties!



Smokin'!
Take-out, Sit-down, Catering
12514 Burbank Blvd.
Valley Village, CA 91607

Tel: 818-752-6866

email: craig@ganeden.com

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Save the Date - June 22, 2009 Swing for a Cure


Save the Date!
Monday, June 22, 2009

La Canada Flintridge Country Club
5500 Godbey Drive
La Canada Flintridge, CA 91011

Call (626) 792-3175 for more information
or e-mail info at andrewtorres.org
andrewtorres.org

Thursday, December 11, 2008

Jock Muscle Recipes

Going to the gym again? Try these links. Try this recipe:

Chocolate Banana Crunch
1 serving of Jock Muscle Chocolate Whey
8 oz. of water or milk
1 banana
3 ice cubes
4 low fat chocolate wafers

Directions:
1. In a blender, mix chocolate whey protein and water/milk.
2. Add banana and ice cubes to blender, and blend on high 45 seconds.
3. Add chocolate wafers, then blend at low speed for 10 seconds.
4. Drink immediately.



  • Jock Muscle
  • The Blog
  • Wednesday, December 10, 2008

    MYBLOG by Ouriel: My ShakShuka recipe


    MYBLOG by Ouriel: My ShakShuka recipe: "1 white onion
    Garlic
    1 red pepper (option add 1 green pepper but not for me)
    1 cup of sugar
    concentrate of tomatoe
    2 tomates
    4 eggs (2/personn)
    olive oil
    Parsley, cumin, pepper, salt
    1 large pan"

    Tuesday, December 9, 2008

    My Jewish Learning: Shakshuka Recipe

    My Jewish Learning: Shakshuka Recipe
    A recipe for one of the most popular egg dishes in Israel
    By Joan Nathan
    Reprinted with permission from The Foods of Israel Today (Knopf).



    In 1930, Simon Agranat, the chief justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, wrote to his aunt and uncle in Chicago: "I had my eighth successive egg meal during my three-day jour­ney through the Emek (the valley)." Eggs have always been a main protein for people in Israel. When I lived in Jerusalem, I would make for my breakfast--or even for dinner--scrambled eggs with sauteed spring onions, fresh herbs, and dollops of cream cheese melted into the eggs as they were cooking...CLICK HERE FOR FULL ARTICLE

    Sunday, November 30, 2008

    Bone marrow drive for Walter Furman Dec 7th at PJTC

    Stem Cell Match Drive for this Sunday

    Walter Furman currently is fighting Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, a particularly aggressive form of cancer affecting the production of healthy blood cells. The only cure for this disease is a bone marrow transplant. Bone marrow matches are most likely to be found within ethnic groups. There are currently over 700,000 Jewish donors in the various bone marrow registries across the world, but none have matched Walter’s profile.

    Pasadena Jewish Temple will host a stem cell match drive this Sunday, December 7th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. All Jewish community members between the ages of 18 and 61 are encouraged to come in for testing. All that is required is registration in the National Bone Marrow Registry and a mouth swab. If a match is made, most likely the transfusion will involve giving blood only.

    Walter is a social science researcher and on the faculty of UCLA. He is the husband of Dr. Miriam Shenfeld and the father of four daughters, Alissa, Becky, Caroline, and Kayla.

    For more information, please contact the PJTC office, 626-798-1161. Pasadena Jewish Temple & Center is located at 1434 N Altadena Dr Pasadena, CA 91107 (626) 798-1161



    Pasadena Jewish Temple & Center 

    Wednesday, November 12, 2008

    The Bagels of Los Angeles


    Today's Los Angeles Times reports on Los Angeles BAGELS:
    "Most people choose the bagel they grew up with," says Richard Friedman, and for most Southern Californians, whether they know it or not, that means the choice is bagels made either by Friedman or his oldest competitor.

    Though there is a wealth of Jewish delis in Southern California, most of the best-known buy their bagels from either Friedman's 55-year-old Brooklyn Bagel Bakery or Steve Ustin's 61-year-old Western Bagel. If you eat at Nate 'n Al, Langer's, Art's or Factor's delis, you prefer Brooklyn's bagels. If you prefer Brent's or Mort's, you're a Western Bagel person.
    Certainly there are other bagel bakeries in the area, including the Bagel Broker in the Fairfax District and the kosher Bagel Factory outlets on the Westside and in Torrance. And there are a few delis that bake their own, including Junior's and Canter's.CLICK HERE FOR The bagel: an L.A. story - Los Angeles Times

    A related story {The best bagels in the Los Angeles area - Los Angeles Times) lists all those bagel places

    The Bagel Broker. 7825 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 931-1258. www.bagelbroker.com. 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday; 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

    The Bagel Factory. 8986 Cadillac Ave., Los Angeles, (310) 837-6046; 3004 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 477-8460; 21157 Hawthorne Blvd., Torrance, (310) 540-2077. www.thebagelfactoryinc. 5:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Saturday; 5:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

    Brooklyn Bagel Bakery. 2217 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, (213) 413-4114. Open 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.

    Western Bagel. Headquarters with retail store, 7814 Sepulveda Blvd., Van Nuys, (818) 786-5847. www.westernbagel.com. Ten retail stores with varying hours, see website for details
    ...And here's YELP

    Monday, July 28, 2008

    Wednesday, July 23, 2008

    SITK | Homepage

    SITK | Homepage

    ____________________________________________________
    Save the date: From the Exile is pleased to announce that Roz Rothstein, founder and Executive Director of Stand With Us will speak at Pasadena Jewish Temple & Center on September 10, 2008.

    The opinions expresses in From the Exile are not the opinions of Pasadena Jewish Temple & Center or PJTC. This is an independent blog.

    Sunday, July 20, 2008

    Jamie Oliver - Recipes Sicilian Street Salad

    CLICK HERE FOR FULL RECIPE

    serves Serves 4 to 6
    ingredients
    • 500g/1lb 2oz new potatoes, scrubbed
    • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 3 handfuls of mixed crunchy salad leaves, e.g. radicchio, rocket, romaine
    • a small handful of fresh mint, leaves picked and torn
    • 1 bulb of fennel, halved and finely sliced, herby tops reserved
    • optional: ½ a Cedro lemon, sliced wafer thin

    for the Sicilian blood orange dressing
    • juice of 1 blood orange
    • 3 tablespoons good-quality white wine vinegar or herb vinegar
    • extra virgin olive oil
    a good pinch of dried oregano
    • 2 tablespoons capers, washed if using salted, chopped if large
    sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


    Serve de 4 a 6
    ingredientes
    • 500g/1lb 2 onças novas batatas, scrubbed
    • sal marinho e pimenta preta recém terreno
    • 3 handfuls Crunchy salada mista de folhas, por exemplo, radicchio, foguete, Romaine
    • um pequeno punhado de hortelã fresca, deixa colhidos e rasgada
    • 1 bulbo de funcho, finamente cortada para metade e, herby tops reservados
    • opcionais: ½ Cedro um limão, cortado bolacha fina

    para o siciliano sangue laranja vestir
    • suco de laranja 1 sangue
    • 3 colheres de boa qualidade vinagre de vinho branco ou erva vinagre
    • Azeite virgem extra
    uma boa pitada de orégano secos
    • 2 colheres capers, lavado se utilizando salgados, chopped se grandes
    sal marinho e pimenta preta recém terreno

    Wednesday, July 16, 2008

    Southwestern Pulled Brisket Beef - Slow cooker

    This is an adjusted recipe for From Food Network Kitchens, adjusted for Kashrut purposes. This works well in a slow cooker... See also Step-by-step photos

    3 pounds beef brisket
    Kosher salt
    Freshly ground black pepper
    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    5 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
    1 Spanish onion, halved and thinly sliced
    1 tablespoon chili powder
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    1 1/2 cups water
    1 (14 1/2-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, with their juices
    2 whole canned chipotle chiles en adobo
    2 bay leaves
    3 tablespoons molasses
    Soft Parve sandwich buns
    Pickled jalapenos

    Season the beef generously with salt and pepper, to taste. Heat a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil and heat just until beginning to smoke. Add the meat and cook, turning once, until browned on both sides, about 10 minutes total. Transfer the meat to the slow cooker; leave the skillet on the heat.
    Add garlic, onion, chili powder, coriander, and cumin to drippings in the skillet and stir until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add vinegar and boil until it's almost gone, scraping the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon. Stir in water and pour the mixture over the brisket. Crush the tomatoes through your fingers into the slow cooker; add the tomato juices, chipotles, bay leaves, and molasses. Cover the cooker, set it on LOW, and cook the brisket until it pulls apart easily with a fork, about 8 hours.

    To serve, leave the meat in the slow cooker and use 2 forks to pull it apart and stir it evenly into the sauce; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Remove and discard bay leaves. Pile the meat on sandwich buns and serve with jalapenos. (This is also great rolled up in parve tortillas, available in SoCal with a heckher at Ralphs, as well as at the Kosher stores.)

    Tuesday, July 15, 2008

    Golden oldie Kugel Blog

    February 15, 2007

    Unanimous opinion knocks out Ninth Circuit decision that
    time-barred all Kugel related disease litigation in the Golden State
    Boston, MA:

    BACKGROUND

    Kugel companies benefited from a decade of legal immunity from claims by injured schnapps Kugel addicts from 1988-1998. After the legislature corrected this situation, the first four trials against Kugel companies brought by injured Kugel fressers resulted in findings of industry liability and punitive damages. These were:

    February 1999: Kook, Rav., v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest - $51.5 million

    March 2000: Og v. R.J. Reynolds and PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest - $21.75 million

    June 2001: Hagar v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest - $3.05 billion

    October 2002: Amalek v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest - $28 billion

    Although the amount of punitive damages was subsequently reduced and the second of these cases, Ritual Committee vs. Saturday Minyan of PJTC, is being retried right now in San Francisco after being overturned on a technicality , it was clear that well-informed California juries were to be deeply feared by the Kugel industry.

    In 2000, an injured Kugel fresser and correspondence law school student named A. L. sued on her own behalf and represented himself on appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. The appeal interrupted the encouraging start of California Kugel litigation ( Soliman v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest Inc., 311 F.3d 966, (2002). The resulting decision meant that sick Kugel addicts could not sue for their injuries because the statute of limitations began to run at the time the Kugel fresser realized or should have realized that he/she/it was addicted. Because most schnapps -caused diseases manifest themselves decades after the victim is addicted to the addictive tsuris in the product, virtually all pending cases were be time-barred and attorneys could no longer represent severe indigestion-stricken customers of the Big Kugel, PJTC, PJTC Ritual Committee or the Great Kugel Cookoff.

    The California Supreme Court accepted a transfer of 2 cases pending before the appeals court that ruled in Eliahu v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest and REDACTED v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest . While the Court's rulings in regard to the two plaintiffs, Mr. Eliahu and Ms. REDACTED, are mixed, the importance of today's unanimous opinion and the reason the case was taken up by the state's highest court, is to dismiss the peculiar notion that the addiction that usually occurs within weeks of Kugel- initiation marks the start of the 2 year statute of limitations for filing a personal injury claim.

    Justice REDACTED, joined by Justice REDACTED, writes:
    We reject the proposition advanced by defendants, based on Sisterhood v. PJTC Great Kugel Cookoff Contest , Inc. (9th Cir. 2002) 311 F.3d 966 (M & J), that the statute of limitations should have commenced on the physical injury claims as soon as the minyan discovered or should have discovered each was addicted to schnapps.

    COMMENTARY


    REDACTED Professor of Law at Northeastern University in Boston, noted that, "the California Supreme Court just changed the light from red to green and a high volume of Kugel litigation traffic is about to roar into California Courtrooms."

    REDACTED, Director of the Kugel Products Liability Project at Northeastern University School of Law, stated that, "contrary to many analysts proclamations, the time is ripe for a major resurgence in individual schnapps cases.

    COLESLAW


    Alton Brown has this complicated recipe, but my cousin gave me a simple one:

    Coleslaw Recipe courtesy Alton Brown
    Show: Good Eats
    Episode: Salad Daze II: The Long Arm of the Slaw


    1/2 head green cabbage, thinly sliced
    1/2 head red cabbage, thinly sliced
    1 carrot, thinly sliced
    1/2 cup buttermilk
    2 fluid ounces plain yogurt
    2 fluid ounces mayonnaise
    1 tablespoon pickle juice
    1 teaspoon dry mustard
    1 tablespoon chives, chopped
    Kosher salt, as needed
    1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper


    But this is a simpler way to do it.

    My cousin's simple recipe
    Thin slice some green cabbage
    Put into the bowl
    Sprinkle white wine vinegar on it
    Add a little mayonaise.
    Salt and pepper if you want
    Stir with fork

    Voila'
    I guess you can add shredded carrots or red cabbage, but I like it plain.

    Cooper's Old Time Pit Bar-B-Que ~ LLano, Tx


    Trip To Fredericksburg
    Originally uploaded by mlsnp.

    to do list: Skip the pork, go to Jeff's Sausages and Kosher Club (20lb briskets)





    It's BBQ season. Time to head out to Jeff's Gourmet Glatt Kosher Sausage Factory & Deli Meats, Los Angeles, California8930 W. Pico Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90035
    310-858-8590

    Relish the joy of finely cured and cooked meats, and the thrill of creative salads and slaws. At Jeff's Gourmet we make everything from scratch, using the finest meats, fresh herbs, stocks and California wines.

    14# Brisket Texas Style!


    14# Brisket Texas Style!
    Originally uploaded by tgrier.

    I am putting this brisket on the smoker at midnight for a nice 12-14 hour smoke.

    Uploaded by tgrier on 17 May 08, 10.34PM PDT

    BBQ Texas Brisket part four - Aha!

    Texas Brisket
    Recipe courtesy Paula Deen
    Show: Paula's Home Cooking
    Episode: Tug Boat Catering - Michael's Smokehouse
    1 (5 to 6-pound) brisket, trimmed but left with a layer of fat about 1/4- inch thick
    6 tablespoons House Seasoning, recipe follows
    3 tablespoons chili powder
    1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons onion powder
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    6 cups hickory wood chips, soaked in water for 30 minutes

    Rinse brisket thoroughly under cold water and pat dry with paper towels. In a small bowl, mix together House Seasoning, chili powder, brown sugar, onion powder, oregano and cayenne. Rub brisket with the rub on all sides.

    Follow directions on your grill/smoker for indirect grilling. Place the soaked chips into the chip box, or make a pouch with tin foil for the chips, then place pouch directly on the coals. Place brisket fat side up in a large disposable aluminum pan and place in the center of the grate and cover the grill.

    Slow grill the brisket until tender and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the meat reads about 190 degrees F, about 6 hours. Add coals and wood chips as necessary to maintain a constant temperature. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board to rest for about 10 minutes. Slice the brisket across the grain and serve.

    House Seasoning:
    1 cup salt
    1/4 cup black pepper
    1/4 cup garlic powder
    Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

    Yield: 1 1/2 cups

    Other Recipes from this Episode
    Hot Slaw
    Slow Cooker Pinto Beans
    Strawberry and Cream Pie

    More Recipes Like This

    * Barbecued Texas Beef Brisket
    * Wood Chick's BBQ Smoked Beef Brisket
    * Barbecued Texas-Style Beef Brisket
    * Texas Oven-Roasted Beef Brisket
    * Emeril's Texas-Style SmokeRecipes : Texas Brisket : Food Network

    BBQ Texas Brisket part three Bobbie Flay

    Recipes : Smoked BBQ Brisket : Food Network: "Recipe courtesy Bobby Flay
    Show: Boy Meets Grill
    Episode: Boy Meets Texas Girl"

    1/2 cup ancho chili powder
    2 tablespoons paprika
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    1 tablespoon dry mustard
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    2 teaspoons cayenne
    1 trimmed brisket with a layer of fat at least 1/4-inch thick, about 5 to 6 pounds
    Dark Beer Mop, recipe follows

    Mix together the spices in a small bowl. Rub the entire brisket with the spice mixture, place on a baking sheet, cover and let stand in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour or up to 6 hours.

    Prepare the smoker according to manufacturer's directions. Place the brisket in the smoker, fat side up and smoke for 4 to 5 hours or until extremely tender. Baste with the mop every 30 minutes.

    Dark Beer Mop:
    1 large red onion
    4 cloves garlic
    2 serrano chiles, chopped
    4 bottles of dark beer
    1/4 cup dark brown sugar
    2 bay leaves
    Salt and freshly ground pepper

    Place all ingredients in a medium saucepan, season with salt and pepper and cook over medium heat for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

    BBQ Texas Brisket part two =- overn method?

    Barbecued Texas Beef Brisket
    Recipe courtesy Gourmet magazine
    Show: Cooking Live
    Episode: Food Styling
    Dry Rub:
    1/2 cup paprika
    3 tablespoons ground black pepper
    3 tablespoons coarse salt
    3 tablespoons sugar
    2 tablespoons chili powder
    1 (7 1/2 to 8-pound) untrimmed whole beef brisket

    Mop:
    12 ounces beer
    1/2 cup cider vinegar
    1/2 cup water
    1/4 cup vegetable oil
    2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    2 tablespoons minced jalapeno chilies
    1 cup purchased barbecue sauce (such as Bull's-Eye)
    1 tablespoon chili powder

    Dry Rub: Mix first 5 ingredients in small bowl to blend. Transfer 1 tablespoon dry rub to another small bowl and reserve for mop. Spread remaining dry rub all over brisket. Cover with plastic; chill overnight.

    Mop: Mix first 6 ingredients plus reserved dry rub in heavy medium saucepan. Stir over low heat 5 minutes. Pour 1/2 cup mop into bowl; cover and chill for use in sauce. Cover and chill remaining mop. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place brisket, fat side up, in a Dutch oven or other heavy baking pan large enough to hold the brisket. Roast brisket in pan for 3 to 4 hours, basting with mop every 20 minutes, until tender. Transfer brisket to platter; let stand 15 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Wrap in foil; chill. Before continuing, rewarm brisket, still wrapped, in 350 degree oven about 45 minutes.) Combine barbecue sauce and chili powder in heavy small saucepan. Add any accumulated juices from brisket and bring to boil, thinning sauce with some of reserved 1/2 cup mop, if desired. Thinly slice brisket across grain. Serve, passing sauce separately.
    Recipes : Barbecued Texas Beef Brisket : Food Network

    BBQ Texas Brisket part one

    Texas Brisket
    Recipe courtesy Paula Deen
    Show: Paula's Home Cooking
    Episode: Tug Boat Catering - Michael's Smokehouse
    1 (5 to 6-pound) brisket, trimmed but left with a layer of fat about 1/4- inch thick
    6 tablespoons House Seasoning, recipe follows
    3 tablespoons chili powder
    1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons onion powder
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    6 cups hickory wood chips, soaked in water for 30 minutes

    Rinse brisket thoroughly under cold water and pat dry with paper towels. In a small bowl, mix together House Seasoning, chili powder, brown sugar, onion powder, oregano and cayenne. Rub brisket with the rub on all sides.

    Follow directions on your grill/smoker for indirect grilling. Place the soaked chips into the chip box, or make a pouch with tin foil for the chips, then place pouch directly on the coals. Place brisket fat side up in a large disposable aluminum pan and place in the center of the grate and cover the grill.

    Slow grill the brisket until tender and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the meat reads about 190 degrees F, about 6 hours. Add coals and wood chips as necessary to maintain a constant temperature. Transfer the brisket to a cutting board to rest for about 10 minutes. Slice the brisket across the grain and serve.

    House Seasoning:
    1 cup salt
    1/4 cup black pepper
    1/4 cup garlic powder
    Mix ingredients together and store in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

    Yield: 1 1/2 cups
    Recipes : Texas Brisket : Food Network

    .JBlog Me

    All rights reserved

    Sunday, June 29, 2008

    Bagel Lox Cream Cheese


    Yummy Lox Bagel
    Originally uploaded by WigglyMan.

    Lirac

    This wine goes well with just about anything: Lirac Las Genestiere 2004
    Familial vineyard established in a 17 century chateau. Production of Tavel, Lirac, Côtes du rhône and Vin de Pays d''Oc. Hand picked above 70 hectares.


    Southern Rhône Rosés:
    "Domaine La Genestière, established in 1930, one of the oldtimers in Tavel, was acquired in 1994 by Jean-Claude and Raphael Garcin. They also own the Saint-Anthelme, Les Ramières and Longval estates producing Tavel, Lirac, Côtes du Rhône and Pays du Gard wines. They produce three rosés here: The 2004 Domaine La Genestière Cuvée Tradition Tavel, light salmon colour, nose of strawberries and rose petals, mouth evolves gradually from red berries with a slight touch of white pepper to a dry pleasant acidity. The 2004 Domaine La Genestière Cuvée Raphael Tavel, intense salmon colour, aroma of strawberries and raspberries, mouth of strawberry jam with a warm, slightly tannic and peppery final note. And finally one of those rare Lirac rosés, the 2004 Domaine La Genestière Cuvée Lirac Rosé, light purple color, rich bouquet of fruits and a slowly developing strawberry flavour. Unlike the Tavels the Lirac rosé is produced using the saignée method; it is less complex than the Tavels, rather crisp and fresh; a delightful summer wine for a light meal, like a Pizza Provençale. Retail prices at the cave are around Euro 8. Directions: In the village turn left after the Auberge de Tavel and follow the signs. Domaine La Genestière, Chemin de Cravailleux, 30126 Tavel, Tel: 04 66 50 07 03."

    Sunday, June 8, 2008

    Jamie Oliver - Recipes

    Jamie Oliver - Recipes: "Tomato and basil
    Make sure your tomatoes are really ripe when making this topping. Give them a wash, remove their cores and carefully squeeze out the seeds. Place in a bowl, tear in the basil, season with salt and pepper, then toss with a good glug of olive oil and a good swig of vinegar to balance the flavours to your taste. You can serve the tomatoes either chunky or finely chopped, or you can scrunch them between your fingers before putting them on your basic bruschette – really tasty."

    ingredients
    • 2 handfuls of nice mixed ripe tomatoes
    • a small bunch of fresh basil, leaves picked
    • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • olive oil
    • good-quality white wine or herb vinegar

    Monday, May 12, 2008

    June 1st Kugl Contest at Yiddhs Kayt LA




    On Sunday, June 1, 2008...
    YOU DON'T KNOW KUGL

    Put your kugl to the test at Yiddishkayt LA's 2nd Ever Non-Annual KUGL KUKH-OFF.

    Bring your favorite kugl, or bring your tasting fork, and prepare for a day that will make you question everything you thought you knew about kugl.

    Join Pulitzer Prize winner Jonathan Gold and a panel of celebrity judges for kugl, live entertainment, oral history stations, and a family workshop.

    more information at YiddishKaytLA.Org

    Sunday, June 1, 2008
    1:00 to 4:00 pm
    Valley Cities Jewish Community Center
    Sherman Oaks, CA